MS position – Use of UAVs and GPS telemetry for beaver monitoring in Illinois

Location: Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, Illinois

Salary: ~19,000$ +tuition and benefits for two years.

Start date: 08/17/2020

Last date to apply: 05/29/2020

Description: The Spatial Wildlife Ecology Lab at Southern Illinois University is seeking an excellent MS student to begin in August 2020. The student’s project will focus on developing and testing new approaches to study the distribution and fine-scale movement of beavers in Southern Illinois. The project will potentially include the use of a UAV (drone), satellite imagery, and GPS telemetry. The academic home for the position is at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. The position is two years in duration at ~19,000$.

Qualifications:

  • BS in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation Biology, or a closely related field, with a strong academic record
  • Interest in developing quantitative skills, including the use of R and ArcGIS software (previous experience with GIS is highly desired)
  • Experience in trapping mammals is desirable
  • Ability to perform fieldwork in difficult settings
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Motivated, with an excellent work ethic

To apply: Submit a single pdf that includes a cover letter summarizing your qualifications and interest in the position, followed by a CV, GPA and GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Dr. Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau (gbr@siu.edu).

Website : bastillerousseau.wixsite.com/research

MS position – Drivers of variation in movement strategies of elk in Colorado

Location: Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, Illinois

Salary: ~19,000$ +tuition and benefits for two years.

Start date: 08/17/2020

Last date to apply: 05/29/2020

Description: The Spatial Wildlife Ecology Lab at Southern Illinois University is seeking an excellent MS student to begin in August 2020. The student’s project will evaluate variation in movement strategies of elk herds across the state of Colorado to identify the potential impact of human development on those movements, and potential consequences for elk fitness. The academic home for the position is at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois under the supervision of Dr. Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Nathaniel Rayl with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The position is two years in duration at ~19,000$.

Qualifications:

  • BS in Wildlife Ecology, Conservation Biology, or a closely related field, with a strong academic record
  • Previous experience with GIS Interest in developing quantitative skills, including the use of R
  • Ability to perform fieldwork in difficult settings
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Motivated, with an excellent work ethic

To apply: Submit a single pdf that includes a cover letter summarizing your qualifications and interest in the position, followed by a CV, GPA and GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Dr. Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau (gbr@siu.edu).

Website : bastillerousseau.wixsite.com/research

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Positions at Trent University – Climate change impacts to permafrost, wildlife and their habitat in the subarctic

MSc and PhD graduate student positions are available in our lab (https://brownecologylab.weebly.com/) to investigate the mechanisms driving change in the subarctic, involving interactions among climate, habitat and wildlife communities. A graduate student project will investigate how climate change may affect wildlife habitat through effects on permafrost. Global warming is considered the greatest threat to biodiversity in the arctic, where the cold climate and seasonal transition between water and ice involving permafrost shape the evolutionary adaptations of wildlife. Research will consist of field work to collect ground measurements, remote sensing technology, and development of mechanistic models to characterize permafrost variation. Additional projects will focus on field-based studies of water bird behavior and breeding success in relation to the direct and indirect effects of climate, habitat and predation risk. Species include dunlin, whimbrel, least sandpiper, and Canada geese.

Students will have the opportunity to directly support wildlife conservation and management and gain experience on a collaborative project with a government agency (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) and partners (York University, Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing).  The projects will use new field sampling and existing datasets to support student work. Field work will be based at the Burntpoint Research Station in Polar Bear Provincial Park, Ontario. The student will work in a collaborative team environment with other graduate students and professional staff.

The student will be enrolled in the Environmental and Life Sciences Graduate Program, Trent University, and under the supervision of Dr. Glen Brown. The projects will begin in September 2020 of January 2021.

Salary: A minimum stipend consistent with Trent University policies for PhD and MSc will be provided (includes a Teaching Assistantship).

Qualifications: Candidates should have a solid background in ecology and an aptitude for statistical and spatial analysis (including geographic information systems and imagery processing), as well as the ability to conduct laborious field work in remote areas for extended periods of time. A willingness to become licensed in firearm use is also required due to the presence of polar bears. Prospective students should meet the minimum requirements for admission to the MSc (https://www.trentu.ca/els/program/msc-program ) or PhD program (https://www.trentu.ca/els/program/phd-program). Must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to receive the funding package available for this position.

Prospective students should send a letter of interest, a CV, unofficial transcripts, and the names of two references to Dr. Glen Brown (glen.brown@ontario.ca). The positions will remain open until suitable candidates are selected.

M.Sc.F. position in ecological modeling at the University of New Brunswick

Now accepting applications from qualified candidates for a 2-year, fully funded Masters of Science in Forestry position focused on process-based modeling of forest landscapes under climate change and forest management.

The position is located at the University of New Brunswick, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management in Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada), with a tentative start date in fall 2020.

This is a joint project between the Canadian Forest Service, Parks Canada, and the University of New Brunswick led by Dr. Anthony R. Taylor and Dr. Loïc D’Orangeville.

The candidate will be expected to learn how to operate and calibrate a sophisticated process-based forest landscape model and apply this model to real-world questions facing the management of Canada’s National parks under climate change.

Qualified candidates should have a Bachelors degree in either forestry, biology, environmental science or an allied discipline. Some previous experience or a strong interest in ecological modeling is important. Experience with computer programming, statistics, and the R Statistical Environment would be an asset.

Please send a cover letter (including an expression of interest and description of past relevant experience) and copy of your current Curriculum Vitae to Dr. Loïc D’Orangeville at loic.dorangeville@unb.ca. The position is open until filled, but applicants should submit materials by Friday, May 29, 2020 for full consideration. The process for admission to graduate studies in the Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management is described at https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/forestry/graduate-programs.

Graduate position in fish conservation genomics – McGill University – MacDonald Campus

Scope

The fish population and conservation genomics (FPCG) lab in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University is seeking applications from students interested in pursuing a PhD/MSc in population genomics, comparative phylogenomics, and transcriptomics of local and/or Arctic fish species. The work will consist of performing extensive population RAD and/or RNA sequencing surveys. Although fieldwork experience is not required, a strong potential exists for students to participate in sample collections in Arctic coastal and offshore marine environments, as well as in more local areas (St. Lawrence River and Lac Saint-Pierre).

Skills

Candidates should have an academic background in ecology, evolution, genetics and/or bioinformatics and be an independent learner with a strong work ethic. A working proficiency in the R script writing language would be an asset, as would familiarity with Linux/Unix based high performance computing clusters (HPCC) and the use of bioinformatics packages (e.g., SOAP, Geneious, CLC genomics workbench and GATK among others). The successful candidate should also have strong lab and interpersonal skills allowing them to work well in a laboratory setting and in a group.

The Department

Natural Resource Sciences (NRS) is a multi-disciplinary department based out of McGill’s Macdonald Campus in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue Québec, Canada (http://www.mcgill.ca/nrs/). McGill University offers competitive graduate scholarships, including tuition waivers, and visa differential waivers (for international students that qualify) for applicants based on grades and research experience (please see the sites listed below for more information).

http://www.mcgill.ca/internalawards/

http://www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students

Although funds are available to support a PhD student, the eventual hire is expected to apply for either national/provincial support and/or institutional internal graduate scholarships.  Application To apply, please send a current c.v., unofficial copies of academic transcripts (including undergraduate marks), brief description of your research interests (~ 1 page Max), and contact information for 2-3 referees. Applications will be considered until the position is filled, but priority will be given to those received before May 5th. Electronic applications (PDF only please) can be sent to:

denis.roy5[at]mcgill[dot]ca

Denis Roy
Assistant Professor
Macdonald-Stewart Building
21111 Lakeshore Road
Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec
H9X 3V9
Lab website: http://denisroy.weebly.com

MSc. or Ph.D student position in Plant Phylogenetic Community Ecology at Memorial University of Newfoundland-Canada

I am seeking a motivated MSc or Ph.D. student to conduct a study that aims to understand the phylogenetic diversity of the flora of Newfoundland, and the phylogenetic structure of different habitat types in this island of the north Atlantic. Knowledge of how phylogenetically diverse the flora is in different areas will inform conservation actions in the province. The role of plant traits on the historical assembly of these plant communities could also be addressed, and other hypotheses of the student’s interest. The student will reconstruct a species-level phylogeny of the 1,300 native plants of Newfoundland using publicly available DNA sequences. The student will work under the mentorship of Dr. Julissa Roncal, and collaborate with Dr. Michael Burchinski and Dr. Susan Meades.

Student’s qualifications:

  • A BS degree with Honours or MSc degree in a related discipline (e.g. biology, botany, conservation, ecology, molecular biology, bioinformatics)
  • Strong knowledge of phylogenetic and phylogenetic comparative methods, ability to code in R.
  • Experience in organismic botany, ecology, and conservation is highly desirable.
  • Excellent writing, analytical, organization and communication skills. Attention to detail.
  • Written and oral proficiency in English is mandatory for international students. TOEFL test required for admission to the university, but not the GRE tests.

Position characteristics:

Project start date is September 2020. The MSc and Ph.D. program comprises two and four years with an annual stipend of $19,000 and $21,000, respectively. The student is expected to assist in teaching laboratories for 56 hours during the fall and winter semesters, but not in the spring. The department of Biology at Memorial University has 29 faculty members and over 100 graduate students. Memorial University is Atlantic Canada’s largest university offering a multicultural environment. Screening will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Position fully funded by NSERC.

How to apply: Interested applicants should send their CV, a one-page statement of research interests and career goals, transcripts, and contact information of 3 references (who have agreed to be contacted) in a single pdf or word file to Dr. Julissa Roncal at Email: jroncal@mun.ca.For more information on the research group visit: https://julissaroncal.wordpress.com/about-me-2/

For instructions on how to apply to Memorial’s graduate program visit: http://www.mun.ca/become/graduate/apply/index.php

FULLY-FUNDED PHD POSITION ON SPECIES RANGE MODELLING AND KEY BIODIVERSITY AREAS

We are looking for a graduate student with a strong background in statistics or modelling to undertake a PhD project whose main objective is to develop species distribution models. The PhD will be completed as part of the Key Biodiversity Areas (KBA) identification process coordinated by the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. The student will be based at the Université de Sherbrooke (Québec) and will join the Computational Biodiversity Science and Services (BIOS2) training program.

Supervisors: Dominique Gravel (UdeS) and Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne (WCS)

Beginning of studies: summer or fall 2020

Funding: Fellowship of $ 20000 CAD per year for 4 years

More information: http://bios2.usherbrooke.ca/2020/02/19/article12/ ou here

Fully-funded MSc position: Insect predator-prey interactions in the agroecosystem

One fully funded MSc student position is available in the Agricultural and Ecological Entomology Group led by Dr. Boyd Mori in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. Ground beetles are recognized as indicator species and important natural enemies, but knowledge is lacking on their role in Prairie crop production systems. Crop type is one of the most influential factors that dictates ground beetle species composition and abundance. Many different crop types are grown on the Prairies, which in turn influence the microclimate and may influence predator-prey interactions. The project aims to study insect predator-prey interactions across cropping systems in the aspen parkland ecoregion of central Alberta and can be tailored to the student depending on their interests.

The candidate will be co-supervised by Dr. Carol Frost in the Department of Renewable Resources (University of Alberta).

We are looking for a student with a strong background in entomology, ecology, agriculture, biology or a related discipline (minimum BSc or equivalent). The student will have strong interpersonal skills, be highly motivated, and have a willingness to learn R. Previous research experience and a Class 5 (non-graduated) Driver’s license will be considered assets. The successful student will be awarded a stipend of $21,000 (Canadian) per year (2-year duration).

The project will begin in May or September 2020. Interested students should send an email to Dr. Boyd Mori (bmori@ualberta.ca) and include a letter of interest, a current CV, a copy of transcripts (unofficial) and the name and contact information of three references.

FUNDED PHD POSITION AVAILABLE IN NORTHERN FISH CONSERVATION GENOMICS (CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY, MONTREAL)

One fully-funded PhD position is available in Dr. Dylan Fraser’s laboratory within the Department of Biology, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (www.dylanfraser.com). The position is associated with a largescale applied research project funded by Genome Canada and Genome Quebec entitled FISHES: Fostering Indigenous Small-scale fisheries for Health, Economy and food SecurityFISHES applies genomics tools to sustainable fisheries management and climate change adaptation for Indigenous communities across northern Canada. The PhD student will conduct research on Walleye, Lake trout or Brook Trout in collaboration with Cree communities in northern Quebec with co-supervision from Dr. Louis Bernatchez (Laval U.: www2.bio.ulaval.ca/louisbernatchez/presentation.htm), and Dr. Louise Chavarie (University of Glasgow, Scotland; https://louisechavarie.weebly.com/) for Lake Trout research.

Potential projects include: (i) population structure, local adaptation, genotype-phenotype associations and genotype-climate associations in key northern fisheries; (ii) mixed-stock harvest dynamics and population spatial ecology; these represent core research foci of FISHES but the student is encouraged to explore independent lines of inquiry.

Experience required: previous research experience with molecular techniques, population genomics/genetics, bioinformatics, statistics, and assisting with field sample collections. Experience working with fishes is an asset but is not essential.

Start date: May or September 2020. Salary: $24,000 CDN per year for four years. Location: Loyola Campus, Concordia University, Montreal. Concordia U. is an emerging, integrative university, Montreal is an amazing culturally-diverse city (ranked one of the best places in the world to attend university by students themselves), and there are plenty of fantastic things to see and do in and outside of the city! Montreal is also one of the most economically affordable large cities in North America.

Submission process. All documents must be submitted to Dylan Fraser (dylan.fraser@concordia.ca):

  • One to two (1-2) page cover letter demonstrating fit with one of the positions described above
  • Current curriculum vitae demonstrating relevant research experience and background
  • Names/contact information for two references

You can learn more about our lab’s research at: www.dylanfraser.com. Please share this announcement with others that might be interested. If you require any additional information, please feel free to contact me.