MSc. or Ph.D student position in Plant Phylogenetic Community Ecology at Memorial University of Newfoundland-Canada

I am seeking a motivated MSc or Ph.D. student to conduct a study that aims to understand the phylogenetic diversity of the flora of Newfoundland, and the phylogenetic structure of different habitat types in this island of the north Atlantic. Knowledge of how phylogenetically diverse the flora is in different areas will inform conservation actions in the province. The role of plant traits on the historical assembly of these plant communities could also be addressed, and other hypotheses of the student’s interest. The student will reconstruct a species-level phylogeny of the 1,300 native plants of Newfoundland using publicly available DNA sequences. The student will work under the mentorship of Dr. Julissa Roncal, and collaborate with Dr. Michael Burchinski and Dr. Susan Meades.

Student’s qualifications:

  • A BS degree with Honours or MSc degree in a related discipline (e.g. biology, botany, conservation, ecology, molecular biology, bioinformatics)
  • Strong knowledge of phylogenetic and phylogenetic comparative methods, ability to code in R.
  • Experience in organismic botany, ecology, and conservation is highly desirable.
  • Excellent writing, analytical, organization and communication skills. Attention to detail.
  • Written and oral proficiency in English is mandatory for international students. TOEFL test required for admission to the university, but not the GRE tests.

Position characteristics:

Project start date is September 2020. The MSc and Ph.D. program comprises two and four years with an annual stipend of $19,000 and $21,000, respectively. The student is expected to assist in teaching laboratories for 56 hours during the fall and winter semesters, but not in the spring. The department of Biology at Memorial University has 29 faculty members and over 100 graduate students. Memorial University is Atlantic Canada’s largest university offering a multicultural environment. Screening will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Position fully funded by NSERC.

How to apply: Interested applicants should send their CV, a one-page statement of research interests and career goals, transcripts, and contact information of 3 references (who have agreed to be contacted) in a single pdf or word file to Dr. Julissa Roncal at Email: jroncal@mun.ca.For more information on the research group visit: https://julissaroncal.wordpress.com/about-me-2/

For instructions on how to apply to Memorial’s graduate program visit: http://www.mun.ca/become/graduate/apply/index.php

Postdoctoral Fellow or Research Associate, Global Ecological Change and Sustainability lab at the School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph

Dr. Anand is seeking a Postdoctoral Fellow or Research Associate to join the Global Ecological Change and Sustainability lab at the School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph. The candidate will work on Dr. Anand’s project “Modelling and Monitoring Agroecological Mosaic Ecosystems for Optimizing Human-Environment Sustainability.” This project is funded by CFREF Food from Thought.

The candidate will work along the following axes of research:

  • Profit mapping and other optimization modelling tools: The candidate will continue a line of work on a) the use of precision agriculture data to identify set-aside lands for biodiversity and b) local optimization methods that identify multiple, alternative landscape patterns that improve biodiversity without reducing land for agricultural activities.
  • Incorporated social network and social learning analyses to understand what drives the adoption of sustainable practices by individuals: The candidate will analyze surveys on the implementation of best management practices and the provision of ecosystem services in farms to identify social drivers that guide the adoption of sustainable practices. The candidate will also participate in a collaboration involving social networks and learning with this same objective.

The candidate is expected to:

  • Work proactively as an individual and as part of a team;
  • Lead the scientific publications that result from their research;
  • Contribute to the preparation of grant progress reports and proposals;
  • Participate in lab meetings, providing feedback to graduate students in the lab;
  • Take part in CFREF Food from Thought meetings and symposia;
  • Engage with faculty across campus, farmer groups, and other stakeholders as needed;
  • Maintain an open mind to work in an interdisciplinary fashion, merging natural and social sciences to solve complex socio-environmental problems; and,
  • Uphold ethical and research standards.

Qualifications:

  • PhD degree in Environmental Sciences, Geography, Agriculture, or relevant field.
  • Excellent quantitative and analytical skills, including uni- and multivariate statistics. Experience with structural equation modeling or path analysis highly desired.
  • Outstanding command of statistical (e.g. R, SAS, SPSS, Python) and Geographic Information Systems software (e.g. ArcMap).
  • Track record in quantitative ecology, agroecological systems, environmental monitoring, human-environment modeling, and/or survey design.

Compensation: CAD $50,000/year plus benefits. One-year contract, renewable. Start date: May 2020.

How to apply: Send resume (2 pages max.) and letter of intent indicating relevant experience and interest in the project to Dr. Anand (manand@uoguelph.ca).

More info: Dr. Anand’s researchCFREF Food from Thoughtliving in Guelph.

FULLY-FUNDED PHD POSITION ON SPECIES RANGE MODELLING AND KEY BIODIVERSITY AREAS

We are looking for a graduate student with a strong background in statistics or modelling to undertake a PhD project whose main objective is to develop species distribution models. The PhD will be completed as part of the Key Biodiversity Areas (KBA) identification process coordinated by the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. The student will be based at the Université de Sherbrooke (Québec) and will join the Computational Biodiversity Science and Services (BIOS2) training program.

Supervisors: Dominique Gravel (UdeS) and Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne (WCS)

Beginning of studies: summer or fall 2020

Funding: Fellowship of $ 20000 CAD per year for 4 years

More information: http://bios2.usherbrooke.ca/2020/02/19/article12/ ou here

Fully-funded MSc position: Insect predator-prey interactions in the agroecosystem

One fully funded MSc student position is available in the Agricultural and Ecological Entomology Group led by Dr. Boyd Mori in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. Ground beetles are recognized as indicator species and important natural enemies, but knowledge is lacking on their role in Prairie crop production systems. Crop type is one of the most influential factors that dictates ground beetle species composition and abundance. Many different crop types are grown on the Prairies, which in turn influence the microclimate and may influence predator-prey interactions. The project aims to study insect predator-prey interactions across cropping systems in the aspen parkland ecoregion of central Alberta and can be tailored to the student depending on their interests.

The candidate will be co-supervised by Dr. Carol Frost in the Department of Renewable Resources (University of Alberta).

We are looking for a student with a strong background in entomology, ecology, agriculture, biology or a related discipline (minimum BSc or equivalent). The student will have strong interpersonal skills, be highly motivated, and have a willingness to learn R. Previous research experience and a Class 5 (non-graduated) Driver’s license will be considered assets. The successful student will be awarded a stipend of $21,000 (Canadian) per year (2-year duration).

The project will begin in May or September 2020. Interested students should send an email to Dr. Boyd Mori (bmori@ualberta.ca) and include a letter of interest, a current CV, a copy of transcripts (unofficial) and the name and contact information of three references.

FUNDED PHD POSITION AVAILABLE IN NORTHERN FISH CONSERVATION GENOMICS (CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY, MONTREAL)

One fully-funded PhD position is available in Dr. Dylan Fraser’s laboratory within the Department of Biology, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (www.dylanfraser.com). The position is associated with a largescale applied research project funded by Genome Canada and Genome Quebec entitled FISHES: Fostering Indigenous Small-scale fisheries for Health, Economy and food SecurityFISHES applies genomics tools to sustainable fisheries management and climate change adaptation for Indigenous communities across northern Canada. The PhD student will conduct research on Walleye, Lake trout or Brook Trout in collaboration with Cree communities in northern Quebec with co-supervision from Dr. Louis Bernatchez (Laval U.: www2.bio.ulaval.ca/louisbernatchez/presentation.htm), and Dr. Louise Chavarie (University of Glasgow, Scotland; https://louisechavarie.weebly.com/) for Lake Trout research.

Potential projects include: (i) population structure, local adaptation, genotype-phenotype associations and genotype-climate associations in key northern fisheries; (ii) mixed-stock harvest dynamics and population spatial ecology; these represent core research foci of FISHES but the student is encouraged to explore independent lines of inquiry.

Experience required: previous research experience with molecular techniques, population genomics/genetics, bioinformatics, statistics, and assisting with field sample collections. Experience working with fishes is an asset but is not essential.

Start date: May or September 2020. Salary: $24,000 CDN per year for four years. Location: Loyola Campus, Concordia University, Montreal. Concordia U. is an emerging, integrative university, Montreal is an amazing culturally-diverse city (ranked one of the best places in the world to attend university by students themselves), and there are plenty of fantastic things to see and do in and outside of the city! Montreal is also one of the most economically affordable large cities in North America.

Submission process. All documents must be submitted to Dylan Fraser (dylan.fraser@concordia.ca):

  • One to two (1-2) page cover letter demonstrating fit with one of the positions described above
  • Current curriculum vitae demonstrating relevant research experience and background
  • Names/contact information for two references

You can learn more about our lab’s research at: www.dylanfraser.com. Please share this announcement with others that might be interested. If you require any additional information, please feel free to contact me.

New PhD position – Predicting growth responses of boreal forests: an approach based on analysis and modeling of ecophysiological processes

PhD based at the University of Quebec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue

We are looking for a student for an exciting PhD project in the boreal forest. The main objective of the project is to improve understanding of the ecophysiological functioning of selected forest species (mainly black spruce, balsam fir, trembling aspen and jack pine) in order to characterize and anticipate the effects of climate change on northern forest ecosystems. We have access to the longest and most comprehensive intra-annual monitoring of the growth of boreal forests (up to 15 years of intra-annual monitoring at some sites). These data mainly include monitoring of phenology and xylogenesis (i.e. wood formation). In some cases, we also have data on sap flow, concentration of non-structural carbohydrates and photosynthesis. These data will allow the validation and improvement of mechanistic ecophysiological models that will be used to test hypotheses on the water and carbon functioning of the studied forest sites, both at the tree scale and at the stand scale.

Objectives and methodology: The scientific approach will merge the use of experimental data and mechanistic modeling to be able to provide information on several forest processes linked to endogenous factors (aging, physiological state of trees) and environmental factors (climate, CO2, nutrient availability, soil properties). The improved model simulations will allow better predictions of ecosystem responses to future climate change. We will mainly use the MAIDEN ecosystem model developed by our team.

Location: The student will join the Forest Research Institute (IRF; https://www.uqat.ca/programmes/irf/) at the Rouyn-Noranda UQAT university campus, and will work under the supervision of Fabio Gennaretti (http://bit.ly/2TTGTLB) and Yves Bergeron (http://bit.ly/2GjuKrr). The IRF has a dynamic, multicultural and international work environment, with 13 professors and more than 60 graduate students working on complementary disciplines, such as modeling, forestry, genetics, biodiversity, ecophysiology and sustainable forest management. The hired student will also be a member of the Research Chair in Sustainable Forest Management (http://chaireafd.uqat.ca/accueilF.asp) and will actively collaborate with our partners (Minister of Forests, Wildlife and Parks, Resolute Forest Products, University of Quebec in Chicoutimi, University of Quebec in Montreal, Environment and Climate Change Canada).

Required expertise and skills: We are looking for a student with a master’s degree in ecology or forestry with an interest in modeling and statistics OR a master’s degree in mathematics, physics, statistics or computer science with an interest in their applications in ecology in a climate change context. The student must be able to work with autonomy, curiosity, discipline and motivation within a multidisciplinary team. He / She must be willing to do field work in remote areas, and must have a good team spirit and excellent writing skills.

Supervisors: Fabio Gennaretti and Yves Bergeron

Beginning of studies: Summer or autumn 2020

Funding: Fellowship of Can$ 21000 per year for a total of 3 years.

Interested candidates: Interested candidates must apply by e-mail (fabio.gennaretti@uqat.ca) by sending (1) a cover letter outlining their academic background and research experience, as well as (2) a detailed CV including name and contact information of  three references, and (3) their academic transcripts. More information available at http://bit.ly/2U9ZzqM

Fully funded PhD position: the effects of vegetation and built infrastructure on the urban microclimate

Cities worldwide are experiencing record-breaking summer air temperatures, and high levels of pollution, with serious consequences for people. Increased tree cover, green roofs/facades and a transformation of the built infrastructure and transport system are suggested as climate adaptation and mitigation strategies, but there is still limited understanding about how different aspects of this “green” and “grey” infrastructure work together to influence urban microclimates at multiple scales. We are looking for a PhD student to study the effects of vegetation in the built environment on urban microclimate and air quality in Montreal. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Carly Ziter (Biology Department) and Dr. Ursula Eicker (Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering) at Concordia University, and will be part of Concordia’s Next Generation Cities Excellence Research Cluster, which includes faculty and students in engineering, biology, design, and philosophy.

The selected candidate will actively contribute to the design and implementation of mobile sensor infrastructure to measure fine-scale changes in air temperature and pollution, urban fieldwork to collect empirical measurements, data analysis and interpretation, and writing scientific manuscripts. Project design and analysis will include consideration of the role of green (vegetation cover, structure, and biodiversity; integration of vegetation in the building envelope), grey (impervious surfaces, building structure) and mobile (cars, buses, trucks) components of the urban environment. The research should show the impact of greening the city in relation to different mobility and built environment layouts. Empirical data will also be used to validate urban heat island and airflow models in collaboration with engineering team members. Results of this work will ultimately contribute to understanding the impact of policy changes regarding urban planning, transport, and green infrastructure to create more sustainable cities.

We are looking for a passionate candidate with a master degree (MSc) in a relevant field. This can be either in the biological sciences (ecology, biology, forestry, environmental sciences), or engineering, but preference will be given to students with at least some background and interest in plant ecology and biodiversity. The successful candidate will possess an excellent academic record, strong technical and problem solving skills, and motivation to work in a collaborative, interdisciplinary research team. Financial support is available for a period of four years.

The project will begin in May or September 2020. Interested candidates must submit a letter of motivation, CV, academic transcripts, and the contact information of two references to Carly Ziter (carly.ziter@concordia.ca) and Ursula Eicker (ursula.eicker@concordia.ca).

More Information:

Concordia Next Generation Cities: https://www.concordia.ca/research/chairs/smart-cities
Ziter Urban Landscape Ecology Lab: http://www.carlyziter.com

 

CSEE 2018 student award winners

Congratulations to the CSEE 2018 award winners:

First place oral ($525) – Jalina Bielaska Da Silva. Genetic mechanisms of aggressive sperm-mediated gametic isolation in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

Second place oral ($425) – Quentin Kerr. Temporal stability of genomic differentiation between seasonal spawning components in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

Third place oral ($300) – Frances Stewart. Protected area networks are only as valuable as the working landscapes they conserve.

First place poster ($525) – Samuel Deakin. Spatial genetic population structure of Alberta’s bighorn sheep.

Second place poster ($425) – Katie Birchard. Circadian gene variation with latitude and breeding season in allochronic populations of two pelagic seabird species complexes.

Third place poster ($300) – Jamie Bain. The effects of agricultural intensity on stream metabolism.

2018 EARLY CAREER AWARDS

The CSEE Early Career Awards (ECA) recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. The evaluation committee was extremely impressed with the overall quality of applicants for the 2018 awards, so the process was both gratifying and difficult. This year’s recipients of the ECA were Stephen de Lisle (Postdoctoral Scholar, Lund University; Ph.D. University of Toronto) and Patrick Thompson (Postdoctoral Fellow, University of British Columbia; Ph.D. McGill University). Congratulations to Stephen and Patrick!

Stephen de Lisle

Postdoctoral Scholar (Lund University); Ph.D. University of Toronto

stephen-de-lisleStephen is an evolutionary ecologist interested in understanding how ecological processes drive evolutionary change within and between species. In particular, his research focuses on organisms with separate sexes to understand how and why selection and adaptation differ between males and females of the same species, and how the resulting evolution of sex differences influences both ecological communities and the dynamics of deep-time macroevolutionary diversification. In order to connect process and pattern across these disparate timescales, his research uses a wide range of approaches including ecological field experiments and surveys of wild populations, evolutionary quantitative genetics, and phylogenetic comparative methods.

Patrick Thompson

Postdoctoral Fellow (University of British Columbia); Ph.D. McGill University

patrick-thompsonPatrick Thompson is a community ecologist who seeks to understand the processes that maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in changing environments. His research integrates theory and empirical methods in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems to study how changing land scape connectivity, food-web interactions, and adaptation combine to shape current and future communities. By developing and testing theory on how these processes interactively affect how communities respond to environmental change, his work advances our understanding of how communities operate and seeks to inform strategies for preserving biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in the face of global change.